We test the air in your home to ensure it is safe for you and your family.

How do you know that the air you breathe indoors is safe? Any number of harmful chemicals and pollutants could be invisibly contaminating your home environment. These can come from many sources, from paints and finishings to synthetic furnishings and home appliances. Poor indoor air quality at home can provoke allergies such as asthma – this is a particular concern where young children are present. Indoor air should not contain contaminants that exceed concentrations known to impair health or cause discomfort to occupants. Such contaminants may include various gases, vapours, micro-organisms, dusts, smoke, and other particulate matter. Accutech is the best Indoor Air Quality Testing Southwest Ohio.
Sampling is necessary where:

  • Health care concerns are a problem
  • Litigation is involved
  • The source(s) of the mold contamination is unclear

Sampling allows us to:

  • Locate the source of mold contamination
  • Identify some of the mold species present
  • Differentiate between mold and soot or dirt
Indoor Air Quality

Why Is Indoor Air Quality Important?

The quality of the air we breathe, indoors and outdoors, has a direct effect on our health and comfort. You may notice some of the more prominent side effects of indoor air pollution, like an unpleasant odor, but many others go undetected.
Indoor air pollution can cause serious health issues, including:

  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Sore eyes
  • Burning nose
  • Worsening allergies
  • Respiratory issues
  • Heart disease
  • Cancer
  • Death, when carbon monoxide or other pollutants are present in high concentrations

EPA’s publication, Indoor Air Pollution

An Introduction for Health Professionals , assists health professionals (especially the primary care physician) in diagnosis of patient symptoms that could be related to an indoor air pollution problem. It addresses the health problems that may be caused by contaminants encountered daily in the home and office. Organized according to pollutant or pollutant groups such as environmental tobacco smoke, VOCs, biological pollutants, and sick building syndrome, this booklet lists key signs and symptoms from exposure to these pollutants, provides a diagnostic checklist and quick reference summary, and includes suggestions for remedial action. Also includes references for information contained in each section. This booklet was developed by the American Lung Association, the American Medical Association, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the EPA. EPA Document Reference Number 402-R-94-007, 1994.

Moisture Control

The key to mold control is moisture control. It is important to dry water damaged areas and items within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth. If mold is a problem in your home, clean up the mold and get rid of the excess water or moisture. Fix leaky plumbing or other sources of water. Wash mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely. Absorbent materials (such as ceiling tiles and carpet) that become moldy may have to be replaced.
Water in your home can come from many sources. Water can enter your home by leaking or by seeping through basement floors. Showers or even cooking can add moisture to the air in your home. The amount of moisture that the air in your home can hold depends on the temperature of the air.

  • Fix leaks and seepage. If water is entering the house from the outside, your options range from simple landscaping to extensive excavation and waterproofing. (The ground should slope away from the house.) Water in the basement can result from the lack of gutters or a water flow toward the house. Water leaks in pipes or around tubs and sinks can provide a place for biological pollutants to grow.
  • Put a plastic cover over dirt in crawlspaces to prevent moisture from coming in from the ground. Be sure crawlspaces are well-ventilated.
moisture control
  • Use exhaust fans in bathrooms and kitchens to remove moisture to the outside (not into the attic). Vent your clothes dryer to the outside.
  • Turn off certain appliances (such as humidifiers or kerosene heaters) if you notice moisture on windows and other surfaces.
  • Use dehumidifiers and air conditioners, especially in hot, humid climates, to reduce moisture in the air, but be sure that the appliances themselves don’t become sources of biological pollutants.
  • Raise the temperature of cold surfaces where moisture condenses. Use insulation or storm windows. (A storm window installed on the inside works better than one installed on the outside.) Open doors between rooms (especially doors to closets which may be colder than the rooms) to increase circulation. Circulation carries heat to the cold surfaces. Increase air circulation by using fans and by moving furniture from wall corners to promote air and heat circulation. Be sure that your house has a source of fresh air and can expel excessive moisture from the home.
  • Pay special attention to carpet on concrete floors. Carpet can absorb moisture and serve as a place for biological pollutants to grow. Use area rugs which can be taken up and washed often. In certain climates, if carpet is to be installed over a concrete floor, it may be necessary to use a vapor barrier (plastic sheeting) over the concrete and cover that with sub-flooring (insulation covered with plywood) to prevent a moisture problem.
  • Moisture problems and their solutions differ from one climate to another. The Northeast is cold and wet; the Southwest is hot and dry; the South is hot and wet; and the Western Mountain states are cold and dry. All of these regions can have moisture problems. For example, evaporative coolers used in the Southwest can encourage the growth of biological pollutants. In other hot regions, the use of air conditioners which cool the air too quickly may prevent the air conditioners from running long enough to remove excess moisture from the air. The types of construction and weatherization for the different climates can lead to different problems and solutions.
Southwest Ohio Home Inspections

Accutech Home Inspections has been perfecting the art of Home Inspection since 2004. Our industry has continued to evolve since then, with new standards and more advanced technology to confirm the condition of your home.

But one thing has remained consistent: our dedication to providing the best Home Inspection solutions. You’ve got questions, we’ve got answers!
Your Premier Southwest Ohio Home Inspection Company | Let these experienced home inspectors help keep you from buying The Money Pit. We’ll alert you to any and all health or safety issues and maintenance needs of the home you’re looking to buy.Accutech Home Inspections Services will be your home buying or selling advocate! We are committed to providing you with outstanding service. We’re highly experienced and extremely thorough. If you’re looking to buy or sell in the Southwest Ohio area, we can help!

Owned and operated by a home inspector and mold inspection specialist, Accutech Home Inspections prides himself in being committed to following high standards and providing professional service to all of our customers.